• Latest posts

  • What we write about

  • Archived posts

  • International sports boycott against apartheid

    By Info | February 25, 2010

    The system of apartheid in South Africa existed in the field of sport as in all other walks of life. No ‘mixed’ sport was permitted by the official organisations which selected teams for international competitions. There were no open trials and competition was limited to whites only. This situation was well-known to the international sports bodies which granted unqualified recognition to the racialist, official organisations in South Africa.

    Apartheid was not only limited to the level of administration of sport and selection of participants. As spectators, Africans, Coloureds and Indians were subjected to rigid racial segregation. Sports arenas had separate entrances, seating enclosures and toilet facilities for non-whites. At some arenas non-whites were banned altogether.

    The international sports boycott of South Africa played a major role in bringing an end to apartheid:

    “We understood, as South Africans, the significance of sport for white South Africa. It was like a religion. And if you hit them hard, then you were really getting the message across that they were not welcome in the world as long as they practiced racism in sport.” Abdul Minty, South African exile, British Anti-Apartheid Movement 1959 – 1994

    A new film ‘Fair Play’ by director Connie Fields tells the story of the athletes and activists who pushed South Africa’s apartheid-era teams out of international sporting competitions, helping to bring the human rights crisis in South Africa to the forefront of global attention.

    Listen to former South African cricket captain Dr Ali Bacher and Trevor Richards who founded the Halt All Racist Tours movement in New Zealand 40 years ago, speaking about the boycott on the Today programme on Radio 4.

    In 1971 Abdul Minty prepared a paper for the United Nations Unit on Apartheid on the International Boycott of Apartheid Sport. Read it online and find out more about the role of the Anti-Apartheid in Britain in the boycott.

    Topics: Features | 6 Comments »

    6 Responses to “International sports boycott against apartheid”

    1. Update on the Bahrain F1 Grand Prix – Democracy Standard Says:
      June 8th, 2011 at 5:05 am

      [...] ignore the human suffering.  Sport has potential to be a powerful force for change (such as the boycott of South African sports due to apartheid). Yet, I felt I was hoping against hope, as moral concerns seems to pale [...]

    2. Un nou episod al seriei Amestecul politicului in sport Says:
      December 18th, 2012 at 2:17 am

      [...] History of Apartheid in South Africa link [4] International sports boycott against apartheid link [5] Wikipedia – Sporting boycott of South Africa during the Apartheid era link [6] New York [...]

    3. TRANSCEND MEDIA SERVICE » This Week in History Says:
      July 6th, 2015 at 6:03 am

      [...] International sports boycott against apartheid – ActSA.org [...]

    4. Rugby World Cup 2015: South Africa May Be Forced To Stay Home Due To Lack Of Black Players | Likev.net Says:
      September 1st, 2015 at 8:05 pm

      [...] including rugby, the most popular sport among the South African white community — were banned from taking part in international [...]

    5. Rugby World Cup 2015: South Africa May Be Forced To Stay Home Due To Lack Of Black Players – VIBnews Says:
      September 1st, 2015 at 8:40 pm

      [...] teams — including rugby, the most popular sport among the South African white community — were banned from taking part in international [...]

    6. Rugby World Cup 2015: South Africa May Be Forced To Stay Home Due To Lack Of Black PlayersKaXtone.com | KaXtone.com Says:
      September 2nd, 2015 at 1:33 am

      [...] teams — including rugby, the most popular sport among the South African white community — were banned from taking part in international [...]

    Leave a comment